Thursday, April 15, 2010

Can Science Cure Society?

Our society is an amazingly dichotomous organism. Always changing, growing and morphing.

We are also a society of "blamers."   It's usually the fault of the other guy or the proverbial whipping boy, "they."

It doesn't matter what the problem or deficiency is.
  • drugs
  • unemployment
  • student non-thinking
  • new diseases
  • creating dullards with EED overuse
  • terrorism threats
 Problems abound, yet optimism abounds even more. Someday, somehow any given problem we face will be fixed. Schools get more money for more high-tech stuff, drug companies spend billions on research to cure anything that 'ails us. Pure science researchers continue the quest for unlimited, non-polluting energy sources.

C'mon, you science guys... get cracking! Invent new stuff. Develop new science that leads to a new society.

Forget Orwell and Huxley. Hey, we're humans. We're smart enough to eschew apathy and mental dullness, no matter what science or society throw at us.

Aren't we?

60 comments:

  1. Can science cure society? It’s an interesting question considering I feel as if in the year 2010 we completely rely on the hope that there will be improvements in science and technology. In a world where the “new item” is something that can make life that much simpler, or, where doctors can come up with new cures to diseases that kill our loved ones and friends, it’s hard to not say that science CAN cure our society. However, as a Christian, to me that sends off the alarm of forgetting the reason why innovators come up with technology or how doctors find cures-all of it comes from our heavenly Creator who knows all and is simply moving his puppets along in a play. Therefore, I do not think that science can cure society, I believe that God “cures” our society with blessing his children with advancements in areas of science for our day and age.

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  2. Jessica LuchtenburgApril 27, 2010 at 11:49 AM

    In our quest to move forward in technology, we leave behind things that generations before us had and cherished. Whatever happened to quiet? To sitting and thinking? To learned and friendly discussions and debates? To critical thinking? They have been replaced by Google and by devices to make life easier. We as humans have so much information but so little knowledge now. We have facts but little wisdom. This easy service society has even transformed our morals as we no longer have to deal with many of the consequences that faced our predecessors. Condoms and abortions have replaced abstinence and self-control; escapism through videogames and movies has replaced facing reality; cell phones have replaced face-to-face conversations; fast food “restaurants” replace home cooked meals. We loose touch with each other as we jump into what our culture feeds us.

    And do books like 1984 and A Brave New World warn us about what lies ahead if we continue on our technologically-driven path? Yes; however, who reads them? They may be assigned as mandatory high school reading, but when sparknotes can spit out a nicely-wrapped summary without all the messiness of making the student face and wrestle with all the annoying themes presented in these books, why choose the hard way?

    Again, I reemphasize: Why choose the hard way? In this society, there is no need to because our culture is focused on keeping us comfortable and happy. Life is catered to making itself easy as we run after technology. We may see this trap, and we may even blame technology and our culture, but we still take part in it. We may identify and blame Google as taking away from our research capabilities, but we still use it and we bless it for the time and energy it frees for us. We are stuck in the trap of our making and continue down this same path.

    What can free us? In this society that wants us to become our own gods and decide our own fate, there is a truth that turns everything we are told upside down. We are not our own gods and there is a better way. It is a difficult way, but it leads to true freedom –not this apathetic soma fed to us by the world. Jesus in the Bible says in John 14:6 that “I am the way, and the truth, and the life…” and Paul presents a Christian life that is difficult but freeing. It is filled with danger, passion, joy, hope, suffering ---all the things we don’t have in our lives, and especially: living.

    The question is: Are we willing to give up the amenities and give up blaming everything and everyone but ourselves and realize we are sinners in need of a graceful God and a great adventure that awaits in choosing true life?

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  3. “Why choose the hard way? In this society, there is no need to because our culture is focused on keeping us comfortable and happy… We are stuck in the trap of our making and continue down this same path.”

    I whole-heartedly agree with Jessica. We’re stuck in a trap because who wants to revert back to days of VHS tapes? Days when we also lived without the security of cell phones? I think the point needs to be made that we are not against technology so much as we are against our reliance on it, and our continued craving for excess. Is such progress really bringing us happiness? Or just an unquenchable need for more?

    It’s not progress that’s the problem, it’s the principle of replacement that is. I find it incredibly easy to socialize on facebook, but extremely difficult to say what I want to say when I’m actually around people. So, can science cure society? Science can attempt, but never solve societal problems. “Someday, somehow any given problem we face will be fixed”. Certain problems, however, can only be solved through individual efforts. We, as individuals, can’t rely on science to fix everything.

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  4. Phillip CongelliereApril 28, 2010 at 12:22 PM

    I agree with miss Luchtenburg and miss Koch to a degree, but this trap of "stuff" we are stuck in is a reflection of the human nature needing immediate fulfillment. For instance, in Nichomachean Ethics, Aristotle asserts “happiness, then, is found to be something perfect and self-sufficient, being the end to which our actions are directed” and it can only be discovered through a “complete lifetime.” This thought is further fleshed out when Aristotle tells us that since “happiness is the best, the finest, the most pleasurable thing of all” we can be content as children in our "stuff," (as Professor Hitchcock says) but can only acquire true contentment when we are at the completion of life. John 10:10 tells us, "The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I CAME THAT THEY MAY HAVE LIFE, AND HAVE IT ABUNDANTLY"!!! This idea gives the young a frustrating belief that happiness does not exist until we have finished everything that life has set before us to accomplish. What do we have to accomplish? See Romans 10:9 and Mark 16:15.
    Now that we can understand the true meaning of eternal happiness, lets move into the goal of immediate happiness, linking it to the radical obsession for new technology and stuff.
    To immediately acquire happiness, do you need a modicum of wealth? Aristotle tells us that “happiness needs the addition of external goods, as we have said; for it is difficult if not impossible to do fine deeds without any resources.” However, I feel that we have enough stuff. Technology has exploded in the last 30 years and look where it has gotten us. . . A CONSTANT NEED FOR MORE, IN A WORLD THAT IS NEVER CONTENT. If Aristotle came down today and saw everything we have created, I believe that he would be in awe. . . until he looked at humanity.
    I have heard before that the happiest people on earth have the bottom 10% of the worlds wealth. If you are a sociology major, you may disagree with me, and I do not intend to make this a discourse or blog ranting on ethical dilemmas. . . yet, look at the times when you were truly happiest.
    Was it Christmas morning with all your new "stuff"? It certainly might be, and that wouldn't be a bad thing, if that memory was when you were age 15 or younger. As we grow older, then, we carry a responsibility to move from that fixation on "stuff" that doesn't matter long term, to stuff that will matter years from now. The happiest memory I recall was when my mother's test results came back negative for cancer cells after the chemotherapy and surgery. Happiest moments in peoples lives may or may not deal with technology, mine did. But it was technology that healed her, not the latest iphone application, or an episode from the Bachelor.
    So, I enclose a dare. Tune your ears, eyes and hands out of technology that only enhances the immediate pleasures. Live with the intention of improving the future of something, rather than the immediate pleasure of your internal fixations. Practice the art of being truly happy, and content. As Dennis Praeger says, "Happiness is a Serious Problem." Dennis Praeger, Aristotle and I agree. It's about the completed lifetime, not the immediate gratification.

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  5. I agree with both Aranda and Jessica. One of my biggest fears is being too comfortable in life. I have found that the more comfortable I am, the less I rely on anything outside of myself. America, especially, seems to be on the pursuit of a lifestyle in which nobody needs anything besides themselves. We live in a very individualistic society - and while many people may see that as fixing problems, I don't know that agree. I don't see it as a problem that I don't have every imaginable convenience. So I guess to answer the question if Science can cure society...I think first you have to ask what is really wrong with society? What are actually problems, and who defines that?

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  6. I think Pablo Picasso put it best saying, "Computers are useless. All they can do is give you answers." I think that the key to what he is saying is that our technology has stunted our thinking skills. But this technology has also given us tremendous advances in the medical and scientific world. It all depends on how we use these innovations. I believe the tendency of most people is to rely solely on technology for security (comfort), information and entertainment. But we must work towards using science for more knowledge, a better society, and saving lives. 100% dependence on technology cannot be an option for current society. Personally I am thankful for the internet and cell phones but I am reminded by the Picasso quote that I cannot allow for my mind and thinking skills to be hindered or diminished because I do not want to not have opinions or well thought out ideas. Find happiness in the interactions you have with people, not the e-mail chain you have. Take time to enjoy simplicity.

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  7. I agree with Aranda. "It’s not progress that’s the problem, it’s the principle of replacement that is. I find it incredibly easy to socialize on facebook, but extremely difficult to say what I want to say when I’m actually around people." I think that technology is great and very helpful, but we shouldn't get rid of that face-to-face connection we have with others that actually means something or using our own minds to think through situations. I agree that it's EASIER to talk to people without actually seeing them face-to-face because you have your facebook profile or a text to hide behind and you don't have to show you're true self. I also think people feel comfortable with that because they're too scared to show who they really are without getting made fun of or "shot down," but I believe that face-to-face relationships are necessary for life. I believe God created us to have relationships with people and be a part of communities to help each other grow in Him, love each other, and take care of each other. In the first place God created humans without technology, so I don't think technology and science are necessary to live according to God's will. Not to say that I don't believe technology is good, but it can be very helpful in connecting people and spreading God's word. I still think we need to take that extra step and keep those connections with the actual person on the other side instead of just their profile online. God wouldn't have given people the knowledge to create such things as the internet and cell phones if He didn't want us to use them for His good, so I agree also with scharles when they said, "I do not think that science can cure society, I believe that God “cures” our society with blessing his children with advancements in areas of science for our day and age."

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  8. “We're smart enough to eschew apathy and mental dullness, no matter what science or society throw at us…aren’t we?”

    We are SMART enough, but are we AWARE enough? ‘Mental dullness’ can happen without our knowledge. We can be as careful as we want, but at the same time miss all the signs.

    “We are also a society of ‘blamers.’ It's usually the fault of the other guy or the proverbial whipping boy, ‘they’.”

    Well we wouldn’t have anyone to ‘blame’, if ‘they’ would just get it right the first time, right? You make a good point, Professor. What I find interesting is how we only blame ‘them’ after we have fully invested trust in ‘them’ and then been disappointed. We never blame the people who mess up, of whom we always doubted in the first place.

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  9. I really enjoyed reading Philip’s argument, especially his points referring to the twentieth century philosophy “to immediately acquire happiness” versus what the actual definition of “happiness” pertains. I agree, with the statement “the happiest people on earth have the bottom 10% of the worlds wealth.” Although I am not what I would classify as knowledgeable, I have been fortunate to experience spending an adequate amount of time on mission trips in Mexico, New Orleans, Africa, and other not as recognizable locations that seem to endure incredible amounts of poverty. For the most part, these are the people I find most in tune with God and able to rely on him and thus are somehow in return given complete happiness. Happiness does come from technology, it also comes from science, however, joy comes from not such cliché or simple of things, but instead “Godly” things. I don’t just want to be happy, I want to be joyful. I couldn’t help but question Philip’s statement about “The happiest memory I recall was when my mother’s test results came back negative for cancer cells.” This is joy I would argue, not happiness, but I become the hypocrite because it could be argued that this joy occurs because from science and improvements in technology we have found ways to catch cancer sooner and quicker and thus can alleviate cancer cells. Whether this be happiness, or joy it's hard to tell, but I am thankful for the "stuff" that comes along to bring this joy.

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  10. "Someday, somehow any given problem we face will be fixed." This is an extremely scary idea. As humans is a part of our DNA to solve problems. We love the feeling of accomplishment after solving a problem or reaching the end of a long process. Sure at the end everyone wishes the answer could have just been given to them or there was an easier way, but is that really what we want or need? Through these problems we learn so much more than the answer we were striving to find. We learn other knowledgeable things along the way and find out things about ourselves through times of stress and thinking critically. I think we need these times to find ourselves and who we are. It is ironic to think how things could be simpler and better in say the 50's or 60's in a time with so much less. Yeah I love my iPhone just as much as the next guy, they are great and make things so much easier, but how is being able to look up any theory or piece of information at the touch of a button sharpening my mind. It is definitely convenient, but I feel that it is just another form of technology enhancing mental dullness in myself and others everyday. Facebook another great tool, no arguing that. It helps to keep in touch with others from faraway places, but is it helping me to become a better writer or put my thoughts into words better? I do not think this should supersede the role of the phone call or face to face interaction. Even this process we are taking part in, would it be more thought enhancing and challenging as a roundtable discussion than a blog? While I commend Professor Hitchcock for embracing technology in the realm of academics, I fear that has to happen this way to get the most out of our generation because we will simply not participate in such a roundtable discussion while only a few that like to have their opinions heard will. Technology and society have created this obvious dynamic. Therefore, I would say we are not "smart enough to eschew apathy and mental dullness," but smart enough increase apathy and mental dullness.

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  11. Can science cure society? I believe that there are a lot of ways science can contribute to aid our society, but not exactly cure it. I believe that science has a big impact on our world as far as new inventions that can keep us healthy and safe. We depend on scientist to create new ideas that will not only benefit our society in a variety of ways but also the near future that lies ahead of us.

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  12. Can science cure society? II.

    How can science cure our society if it can be used towards good and evil. Science, and scientists, have been viewed throughout history as something noble and pure. I believe that our society has been led to believe that anything that scientists do will eventually benefit society. In the past years, however, I believe that view has changed. Although some members of society still hold the traditional view of science, and of scientists, others see that science can be used for good and evil, still others believe that science will only lead to the destruction of nature, with no benefits whatsoever. I believe there is no arguing the fact that science has benefitted society. Medical techniques have saved many lives. The Internet has increased the availability of information to members of society. Research into weather patterns has allowed society to be forewarned of storms, such as tornadoes; and the study of astronomy has given society insight into the formation of Earth and of the solar system. However, science has also had negative effects on society. The cars that we drive pollute the air that we breathe. Nuclear technology and weapons are created to take a life of another. There are several negative ways that science can affect our society. So how can science truly cure our society?

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  13. Can science cure society? III.

    I really agree with "scharles" first post. I believe that science doesn't cure society. I believe that God cures society. I also believe that God has blessed us all with talents and gifts to help contribute to our society. We are all his children and are here on earth for a reason. If it weren't for God there wouldn't be doctors or scientist, better yet we wouldn't even exist. God controls everything we do in this world, whether you believe it or not. God cures our society.

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  14. I agree with scharles about where true happiness comes from. I would definitely say true happiness or joy comes from "Godly things." I too have been on mission trips to 3rd world countries. I have been to the Dominican Republic 5 times and have noticed how happy these people are. They are so content with how little they have. When I am with the people of the Dominican Republic I can't help but think of the passage in the Bible talking about how when we help these people the "least of these" we are helping God. I can feel God in their presence and know they have truly been blessed by God. We take so much granted in America. We don't need the science and technology to be truly happy, in fact we would all be happier without. We too, would appreciate what really matters.

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  15. Jessica LuchtenburgMay 2, 2010 at 10:46 PM

    I think there is much wisdom in what Bret said: “We don’t need science and technology to be truly happy.” Jesus told the rich young ruler to give all he had to the poor to follow him. If these commodities become so important to us that they interfere with our relationship with Christ or our availability to serve him, they have become our new masters. Therefore, technology can become an idol. Science is wonderful! But Christians must be on their guard.

    Yes, these commodities make life easier and can provide temporary enjoyment; they allow us to stay connected to friends and family members across distances. But we must question how much control they have on our lives and if relationships built on electronic conversations and disjointed text discussions. I do love technology and I’m thankful for the time it has freed up and easy communication it has allowed. Even so, I wonder if we lose more than we gain and if we even realize anymore that there Is a loss and if we can identify what that loss is…

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  16. James Brunt put it well when he stated that science could be used towards “good and evil”. It is true that even at APU, to be willing to undergo such a prestigious career such as science or wanting to become a scientist is seen as “noble and pure”. I greatly look up to my friends who want to undergo what it means academically to be a doctor or a nurse, I can’t imagine studying for hours like they are required to. However, what I liked especially about his post was his argument not only about the reasons medically that science is a positive, but with weather! I had not even though about how many advances we have made so that we are able to predict major things such as Hurricane Katrina, which allowed many people to leave the city before it struck. The ability to predict weather that has the ability to do major damage such as earthquakes, tsunamis, and tornados are all benefits we get with technology. If I sat here and thought of everything that was science or technology related that affects our world positively than I would be here for hours. Therefore, clearly I view technology as a plus, idolizing it and creating our world around it so that teenagers can barely sit through a class without texting or going on the computer is where I believe we fall short.

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  17. In some ways I am drawn to the healing powers science seems to have on our society. When something goes wrong we simply invent another something more advanced to fix it. However as an artist at heart, I find science often takes the place of what we are truly put here to do, and that is relate to each other. If we keep on inventing things that take the place of humanity, what is the point of our existence at all?
    I have come to believe that our purpose, basically why God put us on this Earth, is to pursue relationships. To love one and other as He as loved us. Yet with the continuing advancement of society, I have found that scientific discoveries, specifically technology, has created a barrier between human relationships. We rely on our computers instead of each other. It seems to go against our purpose.
    I do believe scientific discoveries are what propels us forward as a people group. Cures to diseases and the development of green technology is an advancement we cannot avoid. I guess I just hope that we do not allow science to take our place in our own society. Let it not cure society but assist it so that we do not need it to survive. Let us rely on each other instead.

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  18. I liked this quote from Jessica's post: "We as humans have so much information but so little knowledge now. We have facts but little wisdom."
    It really represents a lot of the thoughts I have been having about how we relate to our own advancement. This also goes along with the question about curing society with science. It leads me to the idea that often we replace true feeling with scientific facts because we refuse to deal with our own emotion. It is the simple concept of avoiding each other with technology.
    I know in my own life I find myself choosing to text someone rather than actually having a conversation with the person. It is more convenient and less emotional. That makes me wonder: am I really so afraid to be vulnerable that I hide behind technology? I think more often than not the answer is yes.
    Why must we allow science to rule over the feelings God placed within us? A scientific cannot cure our pain. We cannot be forgiven with advancement in technology. Only God can do that.

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  19. Reading the post from Professor Hitchcock, I wonder whether or not optimism should be placed in science. I am all for an optimistic attitude, yet I believe we should place our hope and faith in God. If we place it in areas like science, we are sure to be disappointed. Along that idea, if we place our faith in anything or anyone but God we will always be let down.
    Sometimes I feel as though we put too much belief in science and technology to fix our problems. We feel confident as though science is the only way to cure cancer. While a cure would be an absolute blessing from God, we must recognize it by that. A blessing from God. We cannot place our faith in a cure made by man, we must have faith in our God to deliver us. If cancer is meant to be cured, than the Lord will allow it to happen. We must trust that He knows what is best for us.

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  20. "We are also a society of 'blamers.' It's usually the fault of the other guy or the proverbial whipping boy, 'they.'" This is so true in our society and a growing problem. It is so easy to blame someone else than to take responsibility ourselves. I like the point that Aranda brought up how "we only blame ‘them’ after we have fully invested trust in ‘them’ and then been disappointed." We trust these people in our society because they have solved a problem or accomplished something that benefits us. Then when they do something slightly wrong it is so easy to forget what they have done for us. As a society we have no loyalty and do not take responsibility. As Christians I do not think that we should fall into society norm. We should be an example of loyalty to those we put our trust in and take more responsibility for problems in our life and society. We should not look to blame "them" and "they" or look for "them" to solve the problems.

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  21. rachel markwoodMay 3, 2010 at 9:40 PM

    Can Science Cure Society?

    The first thing that came to my mind when contemplating the question, was what is it that society must be cured from? Professor Hitchcock lists a few examples such as drugs, unemployment, student non-thinking, and the overuse of EED's, but I think that the heart of the problem lies there...within the heart.

    Though our era is defined by the use and discovery of new technology, human history is filled with examples of ways people have filled up their time and minds to avoid searching their own hearts and asking the tough question of life.

    In Bible times, people would practice magic. Believing that spirits would solve their problems or blaming them when things went wrong, people avoided taking responsibility for the outcomes of their actions. They failed to see the sin in their lives because it was easier to put the blame on an unseen demon and keep on sinning.

    An example was Jesus' encounter with the Samaritan woman at the well. Found in John 4:1-42, Jesus meets a woman drawing water at a well in the heat of the day, a sign that she is an outcast, and asks her for a drink. He asks her the one question that pin points her sinful lifestyle and goes so far as to speak aloud the extent of the mess she has made due to her sin. Because of this woman's actions, the reader knows that she is not only continuing to live sinfully, she has adapted her ways in order to avoid the other women who probably ridicule her for that sin. Jesus' reaction is to boldly lay out the truth and offer another way, his way.

    If Jesus were on the earth today, I wonder if he would see technology or scientific advancements as means to avoid confronting our sin. I wonder if he would call us out on our dependency on our gadgets and force us to examine our hearts and find if there are evil ways within us.

    Science may cure inconvenience, but only Jesus can cure the heart.

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  22. Who do you blame if something goes wrong in your career? Your boss or former boss? Your employer or past employer? Colleagues, family members, or the person who recently was hired and either took away your job or the promotion you wanted?

    Mr. Hitchcock, I have to absolutely 100% agree with you. We really are a society that focuses on the things that we are struggling with, when in fact, we should put our focus on all of the good that we have accomplished and the good that we still CAN accomplish!

    How about if no one is to blame, but someone is responsible? How about if the responsible person is you?

    We are a society of blamers. (We all do it.) And even though we criticize others for not taking responsibility for their careers, when it's our turn and something happens to us, we look outward to assign blame. And who would fault us? The job market has been very tough and fear has run rampant through many minds. Often times we feel the need to point a finger at someone or something, and in many cases, the finger does not point in our direction. I do not for one second think that we should walk around with a grudge pointing fingers in the other direction. I think when you see something that you do not like, all can you can do if apply it to yourself and at the very-least make a mental note that it is not something you want for yourself. I am saying to accept what happened, learn from the experience, forgive yourself, make a plan to refocus, and then move on. Time will pass anyway, it always does. No one wants to spend their life mad at the world. So forgive and forget. As the saying goes, “Someone is always in a worse position, or having a worse day”. Although at times we may feel as though our world in coming down, we are extremely blessed and fortunate to have the things that we do. If we are able to focus on the positives in life, we will really be able to start changing this place for the better!

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  23. I think that as Christians, the question is to think about what is "good". Is the ability of people to live to age 100 a "good" as far as the Church is concerned? Is all progress good?

    My experience in Cambodia last summer left me convinced that scientific is progress is not inherently good, by any means. A globalized economy has opened the door for Western pedophiles and other sexual perpetrators to fly to Southeast Asia where economic conditions force many women and children into prostitution. Supply and demand.

    This is where I think it's dangerous for the Church to embrace the so-called "free" market capitalist system (not by any means to endorse socialism here). The profit motive fuels scientific progress, but markets are blind to what is good - they care only about how to make money.

    I mean, science doubtless creates "cool stuff," to use Mr. Hamilton's terminology :). But is a world with airplanes more "good" than one in which they were never invented? Soldiers in WWI saw planes used on a large scale in warfare for the first time, and I would imagine that to them, a more simple world would seem desirable. This is kind of an obscure example.

    Take the internet, for example. It's "cool" to have access to so much information so easily, but is the internet good, as far as the Church is to be concerned? Certainly not everything that the internet is used for is good - the massive internet pornography industry, for example, is quite the opposite of good, in my opinion. I'm not worried about technology creating a "1984" situation, but I am worried that technological progress often creates as much evil as it does good.

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  24. I have an iPhone. I love my iPhone. But I'm also strongly considering getting rid of my iPhone.

    A couple of weeks ago, I sat on my front porch one night thinking and watching bugs swarm around the light fixture. After about 15 minutes of reflecting on things, I realized that I hadn't just sat and been and thought in quite some time. I quickly realized that I had left my phone inside, so I went in and grabbed it, then returned to my chair outside. By force of habit I checked my email, Facebook, and Twitter; I moved in Scrabble against a couple of friends; I checked the weather forecast for the next day.

    The information I received in the ten minutes I spent on my phone was essentially irrelevant to my life. I have to agree with Mr. Hamilton about "EEDs" - the static that my iPhone creates in my life can be overwhelming. My brain has begun to form a pattern of obtaining useless knowledge any time that I'm tempted to really relax or just think. I don't think it's a matter of being "smart enough" to eschew mental dullness, so much as practicing disciplines that promote the sort of life we hope to lead. To me, that sort of life isn't one in which I'm connected to people more through an electronic device than in real-life, bodily interaction.

    But discipline isn't something we like a whole lot these days. It's why our churches are full of "believers" but often lacking in disciples. Holding a set of beliefs or doctrines is simple, but being a disciple, a "disciplined one," requires real work. We've equated discipline with punishment, but the word literally means "teaching." In the case of Jesus, it's a teaching that is acted out.

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  25. Cherokee Perez RogersMay 5, 2010 at 5:21 PM

    Can science cure society?? Science is something that has been such an essential thing to creating the society we know today. As the years have passed by society has become more and more technologically savvy. This can be a positive and negative thing, because with these inventions cure for certain diseases and efficient ways of doing things would not be invented. As well though these inventions and advances has created a blinded society. Our society has become so technologically based that people are beginning to drown more and more into our technology. Before people would talk to eachother, face to face and now people who are merely right next to eachother still choose to talk to eachother through text this creates a realistic barrier. Another issue with the great amount of technology is people are beginning to live their lives through fake personas on internet. So through these concepts science will not be able to cure society, in the sense of medicine thats a possibility but through society it's impossible for science to be the cure because it is separating society from reality. Concerning christianity society through technology is being distanced from the Lord because of the amount of distractions it creates. Idolization as well of television and video games are also factors that through science create a barrier for a great relationship with the Lord.
    So overall science can cure through medicine but distance and distract people from a relationship with the Lord with societal technology.

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  26. Can science cure society? That question though it seems simple to answer, is actually sort of hard. I feel that things that we rely on in life such as ipods, computers, cell phone, etc. are always changing or morphing. We as a society expect new inventions, and new medical discoveries to "fix" our problems. But will they really "fix" our problems or make them worse? I feel that they can do both. I feel that they can help cure our society in medical fields for sure. I feel that research for things like cancer or other diseases is something that adds to the curing of our society. However, because I am a christian, I feel that no matter how much science is developed and how many new discoveries our found, our society will never be completely cured because of the lack of faith in God. For me personally, the complaining and blaming is attacked by things that I have learned about the Bible and what Jesus has said. Love is the main message that i can take with me and I fell that a lot of the problems within our society can be solved or cured by that message alone.

    I feel that technology can sometimes be something that hinders our society from being cured. One aspect that I have heard about is the fact that technology is so convenient that real conversation and interaction within society is not consistent. Because of cell phones, video games, and computers, society is focused on those things alone. Although we use computers and cell phones for communication, they face to face communication is lacking.

    So the answer for me is that Science can help cure and at the same time it can hurt our society.

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  27. I agree with with Cherokee, in that technology can hinder and help cure our society. I feel that they best way that science can cure society is through medicine. I also agree that science has blinded society. I feel that people are so reliant on technology to produce the next best thing so that we can have a more comfortable. It can make society lazy blur the sense of realty. I fell that it can increase the selfishness of our society which increases those comments of blaming. I also agree with the idolization of technology. As Christians we are supposed to be acting through love and concentrate on what our calling by God is. Technology can keep up so occupied that we are too distracted to reach out to people face to face, although it can help with reaching out to other countries. So, it can be bad and good at the same time. The question we must ask ourselves is what are we going to do with the science we have?

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  28. I definitely agree with the first post of Sarah's. She address the real core of the problem, our hearts. As Christians we are called to love those around us. That means everyone, the people who hurt us, let us down, and those who are down right mean. All of these people God calls us to love. I think that if we want to "cure" our society, it has to start with the heart of things. I don't really think our society can be "cured". The imperfections in todays society are rooted in the very first time sin entered this earth. With sin, there will never be perfection. The only perfection and "cure that we ahve is through Jesus. Apart from the religious side of that statement, simpley think about what are world would look like without selfishness, dissobedience, and pride. Even those three things are only part of what ails our society. No science can ever "cure that. There i only one thing that can "cure" it and it is love. Pure, selfless love. Honestly if you take a moment and truly think about it, it makes sense. Based on my beliefs, Jesus was the first who displayed that for us. He is the model that we follow and He is the "cure". Science can keep us going just like an tube thats hooked up to a machine can keep a life going on until someone pulls the plug. Jesus and his example of love is that miracle that brings that person to life again.

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  29. Aranda made an interesting comment about blaming:
    "Well we wouldn’t have anyone to ‘blame’, if ‘they’ would just get it right the first time, right? You make a good point, Professor. What I find interesting is how we only blame ‘them’ after we have fully invested trust in ‘them’ and then been disappointed. We never blame the people who mess up, of whom we always doubted in the first place."

    I'm tempted to disagree. I think that we (probably humans in general) are quick to "otherize" people different than ourselves. Some people blame illegal immigrants for crime and economic problems. Some blame a politician that they don't agree with for all of the problems with that politician's jurisdiction, whether that's a city council member or the President of the US. Some blame a type of music or other social phenomena for the way "kids these days" act.

    Does blaming really get anyone anywhere? Does making a loud statement about who is at fault create a constructive situation? The American people are as divided as ever ideologically today. Conservatives and liberals are at each others' throats daily, blaming the latest problems on one side's actions. It's increasingly hard to tell what policies really do create any positive change in our society, when opposing political parties both take credit for all of the good and blame the other for everything bad.

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  30. Marshall JohnsonMay 6, 2010 at 1:23 AM

    One clear outcome from any study of science and society is the realization how closely the two have become linked over time. Our society today could not have been built without the achievements of science, and science could not have achieved what it did without being driven by the needs of civilization and being supported by its infrastructure. But I don't feel it will cure everything because it's not possible to cure everything, as much as science changes, society changes, but the key is society changes at a higher rate than science therefore creating many more ways for science to get caught up with it.

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  31. To Steven Wright

    Clarification:
    I was talking specifically about science. Not the principle of blaming in general. I'm referring to the fact that in science it's easy to ignore things that are going on. Our level of trust has to do with our awareness of what is happening 'scientifically'.

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  32. "We are also a society of "blamers." It's usually the fault of the other guy or the proverbial whipping boy, "they."

    I completely agree with this statement. I believe that our society has started to blame many other people for their own problems. Huge problems that effect their lives in a major way. For example people have now started blaming their parents and how they raised them for their insecurities and their lack of trust. NOW this may be completely true but we need to figure out way to fix it. Im sick and tired of trying to befriend someone and then somewhere in the relationship they cut off all forms of communication because they have trust issues... They say its nothing personnel but they just have "trust issues". Alright so you've been wronged in the past... Go out and fix it. Do something about it. Dont just sit there complaining about how you have these issues.

    This obviously tends to be more of a psychological science problem, but I think its still very relevant. We need to learn how to cope with issues that have happened to us in the past. Yes, morn over the loss of a loved one, but then go out and make the world a better place like they would want you to. Yes, contemplate over the tragedies that have happened to you in the past, but then go out and fix it, go out and make your life mean something. Whatever it is we need to have more optimism in our lives, and quit blaming others for what has happened to us and take responsibility to change yourself... cause your offender is definitely not going to help you.

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  33. rachel markwoodMay 6, 2010 at 2:36 PM

    What Steven Rada just posted about moving on from the past and going out into the world and making a difference is definitely a positive thing, but I think that there needs to be clarification is what is even a "good thing."

    In our Luke/Acts bible class this semester we read a book called "The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind" by Mark Noll. What calls the "scandal" is the Evangelical Christian's failure in loving God with his/her mind. Looking at our history we're done pretty well with loving him with our hearts and souls, but we have completely slacked off in the intellectual department.

    This is relevant to this conversation because in society Christians have played significant roles in the areas of self-improvement and community activities with in the church and even outreach ministries, but there is a serious disconnect with the world of higher intellect and the Christian life. Our technology, systems, and order come from scientists who make it their life's work to develop and invent for the progress of society. Without respected Christian voices in the area of science, it is no wonder we question the direction our society is headed.

    Instead of dwelling on things like end-times theology or what exactly happens when we die, why don't we as Christians devote our energies to searching through the word of God, the history of the Church, the experience of others, and the reasoning minds given to us by God and apply them to the important scientific issues of today such as cloning and genetic engineering.

    What it really comes down to is laziness. It's much easier to busy ourselves by being socially active even for good Christian causes, than it is to sit down, ask God for his wisdom, and sort through what is actually happening in our world.

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  34. In response Allie Bingham's post, i think we DO need to focus on the optimism being on God rather then science. We focus so much on how science has cured us physically or how it has moved our society to new heights and levels, which I completely agree with, BUT none of that could of been possible if it were not for God. He has created us all and created everything in this world.

    I think science is great subject that has helped us and as Christians I do not believe we should neglect it BUT we should honor the one created it. There is nothing wrong with embracing science while at the same glorifying our Lord and Savior.

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  35. My website group and I had the topic of Government surveillance and the idea that "big brother" is watching you. Throughout the investigation of this project we discovered that sometimes technology just goes a bit too far. the US government now has an abundant technological sources to invade our privacy and dehumanize us as a society. I believe we need to maybe slow down the acceleration of technological advancement or control it much more steadily... BUT who would control it? the government? wait aren't they the ones that we are trying to limit?

    This whole idea of technological advancement is hard to give a simple yes or no answer. YES, this is great because it gives us more and better ways to communicate with people, for example across the country. Or because it has helped medical research keep growing and has found cures to diseases that would not of been found without the help of modern technology. YET, NO, its not good because the privacy of instant human beings is being violated simply because the government might suspect their relations with terrorists.... when in reality they have nothing to do with it.

    Its an issue that I think will always be in constant debate.... as the technology keeps on advancing... mhhh :/

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  36. Cherokee Perez RogersMay 6, 2010 at 5:24 PM

    I agree with what Jessica Luchtenburg that as time goes on our society begins to get more and more fully emerged in technology. At that point we begin to forget the simpler things in life and if we continue to ignore the simple things in life the world itself will grow to become a place where things are not cherished but merely used as means for something "greater." As well technology has created many temporary fills in order to keep people satisfied but not in the long run just for a small period of time. like she had stated with things such as abortions. So technology is something that can advance these things and many others therefore expanding this idea of curing society but in reality technology can create somethings that can satisfy temporarily but not permanently. Therefore again technology could merely create distractions that allow people to avoid reality.

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  37. I think science is an incredible gift from God, and beyond that it is such a testament to his existence and power in this world. The way he created everything to work and run together is flawless and to stop and think about it is almost overwhelming. However, the salvation of society is not something I believe is going to come through science, or at least not science alone. The ailments of society run far deeper than even physical disease. And while science may certainly find a cure for all ailments one day, and while technology may reunite people who have lost eachother, or help to make some aspects of our lives much more convenient, this will not cure society. Nothing, short of action of God could cure society because we are human and we live in a fallen and sinful world. We cannot create systems which will always run flawlessly and with perfection because human error always take a toll.

    so, while science is an abundant blessing and resource, we cannot look to it for all the answers to our questions. Some things are beyond science

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  38. In response to Allie Binghams comment about optimism in science, I think that it is good and appropriate to have optimism about the subject. However, it is not good to worship and hope in Science alone. We must recognize science as an act of the all powerful God and be aware of the way He uses it in this world. science has been a means to many changes and improvements throughout the centuries, but really it is God through man which has allowed these things to be discovered. As you said in your post, the Lord will cure cancer when he sees fit, but he will do it through a scientific breakthrough. Hoping for scientific "miracles" is not a bad thing, as long as we know where actual miracles are coming from.

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  39. also, in response to jessica, as well as to the original post, we must also be aware of the dangers of science and technology. It is particularly dangerous to regard science as the one and only hope for our world. many scientific advances can become overwhelming and take over significant aspects of our lives. technology in particular has frequently been a blessing and a curse, because as humans our sinful nature leads us to misuse it. Sometimes people can be so engrossed in using the internet or playing video games or something else of that nature that they begin to withdraw from the people around them and from the reality of the world. It feels safer to remain behind a screen than have to experience things in real life. If we elevate science to the level of a god or a powerful healer we may become less likely to notice its perversions. The internet, while serving many useful purposes is also frequently used to access pornography. and what are we to make of scientific advances in cloning or genetic engineering? Science can be dangerous and we must remain aware of what we are doing and who we are serving.

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  40. In looking back through history, it's incredible what science has accomplished over the last 100 years. Heck, even in the last ten ears amazing new advances have made our way of life more convenient and efficient. The example that comes to mind immediately is the advancement in helping couples conceive who otherwise are not able to. Having children and bringing new life into the world is a wonderful and beautiful thing, one of the highest callings a human can have. If conceiving is something one truly desires, it's devastating if you are physically unable to. All the advances in medication and special procedures are a joy to those couples who have a strong enough desire to have children.

    However, conception is a natural process, and I believe humans can go too far in interfering with nature. For instance, science now has the ability to alter the genetic make-up of a child before it's born, giving parents the option to choose certain features of their baby's appearance, or, in some cases, choosing that their child be born with a "disability."
    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/05/health/05essa.html

    How far is too far? When do we cross the line between helping humanity and degrading it?

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  41. The problem with society itself is we do not need a "cure". A generation of young people who are constantly blaming any deficiency, or characteristic below exceptional, as in need of fixing. We do not need a "cure" for everything. Too many people today are letting society handicap themselves by new drugs or or EEDs. Prescription drug abuse is running rampant around college campuses by students who are striving to gain the mental edge. It is now the norm to try to give our brain power a boost with a pill in an effort to finish off a long paper or have a successful cram session. This is a serious issue that is not addressed as much as it should be. 60 Minutes recently did a piece about the excessive prescription drug abuse around colleges. Supposed mental boosters such as Aderol and Rittalin are in high demand. The piece interviewed multiple students from the University of Kentucky, nearly all of whom admitted to taking the drug and unanimously agreed to drug abuse being the norm around campus. This is just one example of how this generation has allowed prescription drugs and other handicappers to behoove them rather than do the work themselves.We, as a society, need to not rely on such handicaps and stop searching for a cure for everyday occurrences. We ought not to look for some supposed disease to put the blame on but step up and work things out for ourselves. As christians, we should be the ones leading the way rather than following the rest of society as well. God bless.

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  42. cherokee Perez RogersMay 6, 2010 at 9:48 PM

    I also agree with what Michaela Motch, Our society tends to rely on science to "fix" everything but in reality it is not only up to science to fix everything. Science can cure certain diseases and create tools to help modify our society but when it comes down to it the only thing that can cure all of society is God himself. Many people choose to forget the fact that above all is God. People see science as the only cure for things and the great savior, but they choose to ignore that God give the intelligence to create these advances. Technology advances are something that can been put on such a totem pole that many people will idolize that aspect of things and give all glory to the inventors rather than to God. Through this science will create more of a curse upon our society rather than a cure.

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  43. It's true that technology has made our lives easier and more convenient. But hasn't it also made life more complicated? With more and more advanced technology comes higher and higher standards to achieve. I keep thinking of Olympic swimmers. Each Olympic games, another world record is broken. Every four years, athletes are stronger and more fit than the last set of contenders. Will there ever be a cap on what we can achieve?

    If you have never seen "The Gods Must Be Crazy", take a few spare minutes and watch this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66pTPWg_wUw

    It compares the lives of two civilizations: a tribe of desert bushmen and a modern "civilized" society. They exist in the same time period, just about 600 miles away from each other. It's interesting to think what life would be like if it were simpler.

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  44. Steven Rada commented on the government going too far with surveillance technology, and dehumanizing people by invading their private lives. Steven, I agree with you that the speed of technological advances is maybe too much for our society to handle, or should handle. We never dwell enough on one thing before it gets old and we're on to the next. I agree that the government maybe has more access than it should to the private lives of its people. Hacking into someone's email is one thing. On the other hand, we do not own what we put up on facebook or twitter or youtube or on any blog site. It's public information. It's there for anyone to see. I feel the government is free to document that all they want because we are consciously putting it out there. So, we need to be more wise when it comes to how much we're disclosing and putting trust in technology that was created as a product and sold to us.

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  45. "Forget Orwell and Huxley. Hey, we're humans. We're smart enough to eschew apathy and mental dullness, no matter what science or society throw at us."

    Uh, no! This reminds me of the story of babel in Genesis 11 where the people said:

    "They said to each other, "Come, let's make bricks and bake them thoroughly." They used brick instead of stone, and tar for mortar. Then they said, "Come, let us build ourselves a city, with a tower that reaches to the heavens, so that we may make a name for ourselves and not be scattered over the face of the whole earth." (Genesis 11:3-4)

    In Genesis it was excessive pride of self which led them to want to create a name for themselves and place faith in themselves alone. As a result, the Lord created languages to separate the people from being excessively proud as one.

    Initially, it was their belief in lack of mental dullness which spurred the notion to make a name for themselves and then they became scattered foes.

    Likewise, this reason of humans being able to defeat "mental dullness" seems like it's putting too much value within humanity. Humanity is smart. Humanity has created. Humanity has furthered itself in many ways. However, it has only done so in so much as it has been let. Ultimately, humanity was created and can not out-create God. Putting too much of an emphasis on man and what it can do will always result in failed attempts.

    It is true, though. Man has done much. Again, only so much as it graced. Building the Babel was not given to them to do and so God created different languages to separate man and his prideful ways.

    Therefore, if man comes together again, now, to try to beat mental dullness, just as the people in the story of babel did, what will God do this time?

    Ultimately, one must push forward to better oneself but realize that man is not the ultimate power. Man will always be let down. man has a finite mind. man can not fully comprehend the cosmos and ultimately God. As a result, one must be weary at how high an exaltation is given to self otherwise God cna put humanity in its rightful place.

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  46. "Forget Orwell and Huxley. Hey, we're humans. We're smart enough to eschew apathy and mental dullness, no matter what science or society throw at us."

    Uh, no! This reminds me of the story of babel in Genesis 11 where the people said:

    "They said to each other, "Come, let's make bricks and bake them thoroughly." They used brick instead of stone, and tar for mortar. Then they said, "Come, let us build ourselves a city, with a tower that reaches to the heavens, so that we may make a name for ourselves and not be scattered over the face of the whole earth." (Genesis 11:3-4)

    In Genesis it was excessive pride of self which led them to want to create a name for themselves and place faith in themselves alone. As a result, the Lord created languages to separate the people from being excessively proud as one.

    Initially, it was their belief in lack of mental dullness which spurred the notion to make a name for themselves and then they became scattered foes.

    Likewise, this reason of humans being able to defeat "mental dullness" seems like it's putting too much value within humanity. Humanity is smart. Humanity has created. Humanity has furthered itself in many ways. However, it has only done so in so much as it has been let. Ultimately, humanity was created and can not out-create God. Putting too much of an emphasis on man and what it can do will always result in failed attempts.

    It is true, though. Man has done much. Again, only so much as it graced. Building the Babel was not given to them to do and so God created different languages to separate man and his prideful ways.

    Therefore, if man comes together again, now, to try to beat mental dullness, just as the people in the story of babel did, what will God do this time?

    Ultimately, one must push forward to better oneself but realize that man is not the ultimate power. Man will always be let down. man has a finite mind. man can not fully comprehend the cosmos and ultimately God. As a result, one must be weary at how high an exaltation is given to self otherwise God cna put humanity in its rightful place.

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  47. This is in response to Sue:

    I saw the video and I agree with you in thinking it fun to imagine how life would if it was simpler.

    You also raise another interesting point. Although technology has made many advances it has also brought with it a lot of ailment. Cancer is more prone to be contracted now a days then it was years. Before technology present I am sure the death rate was lower since one did not have guns and explosions. however, would one know how to access death statistics without technology?

    I suppose we have to take the good with the bad. Technology is good however so is steak but too much of it will kill you. One must make sure it does not become an idol and source. I feel like it is easy to make a computer or a cell phone get most of your time but as a humans I feel we need to be grounded in human interaction and sensations. With computers, televisions, billboards we are being desensitized but the abundance of sensitory activity and therefore degrading the more natural experiences like how water or wind feels against the skin and putting value not on nature and creation of God but on man and creation of self.

    Therefore, one must be weary to put technology at such a high point. It is not life. It just helps sustain it with a few downfalls but we seem to accept for their upsides!

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  48. This is in response to Sue and Steven's notion about the government invading our privacy through technology:

    I see your points. No one wants to be evaded. However, the bible says everything in the dark shall be brought to light. I wonder what it would like if we were not afraid to showcase everything. This does not mean we billboard our personal lives on a main highway however if the government wants to know about your taxes or who you called what should it matter to us. As long as there is nothing in the darkness it should be fine. A world where no one has to hide reminds me of heaven. I know this is not heaven.

    The problem of my notion is that because it is not heaven there will be a high likelihood that the government will misuse the power to know things about people and perhaps discriminate. This I am not fond of.

    However, overall, if we all lived as though everything in the darkness is in the light would this bother us so much. Perhaps this is a commentary on how our society tries to hide. We do not need to be ashamed in Christ and so we should be able to stand up and say, I have nothing in the darkness, this is who I am. Check it.

    Otherwise, what are you hiding?

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  49. "I believe that our society has started to blame many other people for their own problems. Huge problems that effect their lives in a major way. For example people have now started blaming their parents and how they raised them for their insecurities and their lack of trust." -Steven Rada

    Thank you SO much for adding your new ideas and examples to my quote! I have to completely agree with exactly the same thing that you were saying. It is funny how even in a parent-child situation we always need to have something to place the blame on. When something goes right people go above and beyond to take the credit for the work accomplished, but the second something starts going wrong we look for the first way of pulling ourselves out of a situation by placing the blame on someone else. With science and society I believe it is a similar situation. With government officials using new companies and new technologies to help "ease" life we are continuously seeing the blame placed on different individuals. Whether it be the maker, or the user.

    I really like what Jesse Lagos said above, "The problem of my notion is that because it is not heaven there will be a high likelihood that the government will misuse the power to know things about people and perhaps discriminate. This I am not fond of." This I am not fond of either Jesse! What an interesting concept and idea. This is NOT heaven! As much as we strive for a "perfect" society it is not something that we can accomplish through new scientific advancements. Yes, we can absolutely make new technologies which can make us feel like life is much easier, but will it REALLY solve our problems? This issue is that we need to accept the fact that society just isn't perfect. We have GREAT people in this world, who still make ignorant choices. We must remember that it is not the place we live, or the choices that OTHER people make which make us feel happy. Happiness is a CHOICE that we make. Whether we have amazing new technology and things that seem to make life easier... it is our choice whether or not we want to be happy and feel that our life is filled with joy! In essance, understand that you are blessed, be happy with what you are given, and everything else will easily fall into place! Thanks for all of your wonderful ideas and examples guys!

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  50. Science will always continue to shape society as we know it. We can never forget however that society also shapes the technology that is developed. When a need of something to make our lives simpler is inspired, then scientists get busy working on something that will be benefit to the individual. However with new technology for social networking we find that while it may make us more close in the virtual world it very much so separates us from the community of face to face interaction that can be detrimental to our role in society. As a computer science graduate, I am excited about all that my career holds for me as it continues to grow. The only thing that I wish my field did not do to people is change them into someone who never has the need to leave their home or constantly squanders their time constantly looking up people on the next social site. What ever happened to the way we used to be 10 years ago?

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  51. "We're smart enough to eschew apathy and mental dullness". This statement is suitingly interesting and successfully thought provoking. Aside from advancements in medicine, which is probably the most positive advancement in science, science is leading technology into a world where people don't have to to do very much of anything, let alone think. This is an odd situation for one could argue that the people who are inventing such ingenious technology are highly intelligent and anything but mentally dull. I cannot dispute this- kudos to the Einsteins and DaVincis of our time. However, much of the population the technology is being distributed to is being trained to have to think and do less and less.
    The functions that technology serve help us to cut out steps in our daily routines that would require any "extra" thought or efforts on our part. "Unnecessary" tasks that can be eliminated, are. All for the sake of efficiency people are taking as many shortcuts as is possible. All for the sake of efficiency people are allowing technology to eliminate the extra effort required for thinking. How many vegetables stand behind a counter ringing up totals, but never once have to do math because they can push a button to figure out change? How many people are apathetic about language because they have spell check and don't have to think to do any editing? You can practicallly be illiterate as long as you aren't color blind and can see the red or green lines indicating a spelling or grammar error. Why bother to memorize the periodic table or equations, or anything for that matter, when you can simply go online and look up answers. In fact, our technological society spurs mental dullness. One does not have to be intelligent and witty in order to impress. This is because there is no longer human interaction. it doesn't matter if you don't have anything smart to say because you don't actually have to talk to people face to face. Instead you can go on facebook chat or text saying, "omg!ily QT! lol. neway i g2g, ttyl!"

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  52. back to the original post by scharles
    "Therefore, I do not think that science can cure society, I believe that God “cures” our society with blessing his children with advancements in areas of science for our day and age."
    amen to this! nothing is possible without God! too often we idolize technology and rejoice in a new invention or discovery. Sure we miight add a tagline as to the person responsible for introducing it to society, but how often does God get credit? When you watch the news, the headline(or even the byline) is never Praise GOD!! Instead it is, miraculous breakthrough...thanks to the newest technology, teenage boy manages to go through puberty without his voice cracking once.
    But why is this??? Shouldn't our FIRST adn foremost reaction be to praise God? This used to be instinct, but now it is something we sadly have to REMEMBER to do. Which seldom ever happens. When are we going to start giving God the credit and realize that we can do nothing except through him. He is the vine and we are the branches. We are mere branches and at some point we will wither. The glory is not ours. Any curing or saving that happens in society is not of our own account. Our salvation relies not on technology, not even on ourselves, that is a responsiblity belonging to God alone. Praise be to Him for any success that is within me.

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  53. kat tompkin said...
    back to the original post by scharles
"Therefore, I do not think that science can cure society, I believe that God “cures” our society with blessing his children with advancements in areas of science for our day and age."
amen to this! nothing is possible without God! too often we idolize technology and rejoice in a new invention or discovery. Sure we miight add a tagline as to the person responsible for introducing it to society, but how often does God get credit? When you watch the news, the headline(or even the byline) is never Praise GOD!! Instead it is, miraculous breakthrough...thanks to the newest technology, teenage boy manages to go through puberty without his voice cracking once.
But why is this??? Shouldn't our FIRST adn foremost reaction be to praise God? This used to be instinct, but now it is something we sadly have to REMEMBER to do. Which seldom ever happens. When are we going to start giving God the credit and realize that we can do nothing except through him. He is the vine and we are the branches. We are mere branches and at some point we will wither. The glory is not ours. Any curing or saving that happens in society is not of our own account. Our salvation relies not on technology, not even on ourselves, that is a responsiblity belonging to God alone. Praise be to Him for any success that is within me.




    Response: I agree with Kat Tompkin when she argued that God cure’s society. Science can sure sick people and cure other stuff but I believe God has the ability to cure all who believes in Him! I really liked how Kat uses the example of praising God. Yes I believe that we sometimes overlook at what God has done. We give credit to those who discover the technology and such but we never look to saying, “hey, look what God did!”
    I believe science and come up with all sorts of solution but not for society! Look at us now... economy is horrible.. no one can fix that! Yes, science is discovering ways to cure sickness and technology but can they in the future fix society? I hope so, but in reality the only person I strongly believe that can or will is our heavenly father! :)

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  54. Science has resulted in major advances in medicine, which has resulted in increased life expectancy, lower birth mortality rates, and treatments for illnesses that were previously terminal... resulting in increased population size. Competition for a place as a functional member of society is increased, as well as the competition with other societies to increase the capital to support a large society and fuel a progressive economy.

    Also, science provides us with a a sense that there is "proof", or factual evidence for the otherwise unexplained

    KiKi YE

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  55. science affects society in many ways. For eg. in the harrapan times the 'scientists' made technological advancements in that time in the field of weaponry. This resulted in a war and that was one of the reasons the harrapan society was wiped out.

    KiKi YE

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  56. Though modern science is of relatively recent origin, having started with Galileo about 350 years ago, it has made very rapid progress and completely transformed outwardly the manner of our living. It is said that our life outwardly has changed more in the last one hundred years than it did in thousands of years earlier, because of the scientific knowledge accumulated over the last three centuries, and its application in the form of technology. So the impact of science on society is very visible; progress in agriculture, medicine and health care, telecommunications, transportation, computerization and so on, is part of our daily living.

    KiKi Ye

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  57. Krishnamurti raised the question: Has there been psychological evolution at all in the last two or five thousand years? Have we progressed at all in wisdom, or the quest for truth, inwardly in our consciousness? Science has generated tremendous power; knowledge always gives power and is useful because it increases our abilities. But when we do not have wisdom and love, compassion or brotherhood, which are all by-products of wisdom, then power can be used destructively. Sixty- five percent of all the scientific research being done currently is directly or indirectly meant for developing weapons, and supported by the Defence Ministry in every nation. In the last one century, 208 million people have been killed in wars, which is without precedent in any previous century.

    Tianzhu Qin

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  58. I believe that there's a lot of things science can fix and cure. We've seen it in our track record and we're only just beginning. There are so many preventable disease know because of vaccines and medication. We've saved so many lives. Over time I have no doubt we'll be able to cure cancer. I'm not sure if it'll be in my lifetime. There's so many things we're on the brink of discovering. We recently saw the first baby to be cured of HIV! I don't have a passion for discovering these new things, but I have no doubt that humans have the capacity of great great things. It's just a matter of time.

    G. Santos

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  59. This is an observation I haven't thought of before! Very intriguing...It's as if we view science almost as magic: if there's a problem there's got to be some new technology or drug that can fix it - we're a technologically advanced society, aren't we? We don't have to live in discomfort anymore...at least that's the mentality. Perhaps in our society, the expectation of comfort and happiness is what keeps pushing this mentality. In other parts of the world, comfort is probably not an expectation like it is for us. It's an expectation because there have been so many scientific innovations that make our lives much easier. The question then becomes, are we going to live constantly demanding more as if comfort was the highest goal of humanity, or can we appreciate it but realize there is much more to life than our own personal comfort?

    - Rebecca Stischer

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