Monday, October 17, 2011

Steve Jobs is Dead

Like all humans, his time came... and went. It went seemingly too soon, yet his electronic legacy lives on.

From a wooden cased Apple I (soon to be II) in his garage to the Macintosh realm, then to the family of iPhones, his creative imagination was responsible for things that have radically affected our daily living.

For better or worse, his ideas have married themselves into the fabric of our lives.

For better, quick communication and great computers have made life easier and more efficient.

For worse, we have to wonder about time wasted with inane texting or incessant surfing.

Both sets of circumstances reflect the ongoing battle the human race has encountered when ideas, technology and scripture merge into the reality of existing in a high tech universe.

The ultimate question remains; are there absolute guidelines, principles or rules that govern the use of these cool devices?

Or is that simply ancient rhetorical museing?

64 comments:

  1. I do not think there could be any national guidelines the public should be subject to follow regarding technology. When a person is texting and/or on the internet (assuming not in class, work, etc.), they are on their own time. In no way, shape, or form can any type of government or supreme authority make a guideline in how a person is to spend their free time. That has to be a violation of a person’s right. Government could create a timeline, but it would more likely than not, be ignored completely.
    A standard principle one could follow would be to use texting and the web on spare time. That principle’s alias is known as respect. One should not be distracted by the technology in class, work, church, conversations, etc. Time with people, actual people, should be spent talking/paying attention and participating with them, not with your phone. As it has been said before, when someone answers a text/call in a conversation the message is sent that the person on the other end is more important than the person your attention should be on. Having noticed this feeling of rejectedness, if you will, I have made a commitment to not put my own technology before someone else.
    In defense of the technology person, it has become very difficult to ignore the alerts. It is as if our generation has created a sense of ADD. Seldom does a phone vibrate and a young person can just ignore it. Who could it be? What do they want? Is something wrong? These are just a few of the questions running through our head.
    A possible solution could be taking away the distraction. I have started to put my ringer on silent almost all day. It prevents me from being interrupted in class, work, and time with friends. When I have a chance I will look at my phone and answer texts/calls. It’s not perfect, but it is a start. I believe it is a better solution than government trying to overstep their boundaries and tell me how to live.

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  2. I don't think that there should be guidelines set, because as people with "unalienable" rights, we need to be able to set our own standards and rules. That being said, I don't think that there should be this constant, insane and "ADD-driven" society that cannot ever be without their phones or without their computers. Without these things, our society would be moving at a much slower pace, which wouldn't necessarily be a bad thing. With the never-ending access to the internet or texts, we are constantly in a state of knowledge. I think that there should be some stricter rules set in place in places like church, school or the workplace because it is so annoying when someone is trying to talk or present something and another person's phone goes off. I completely agree with Chelsea when she says that the government shouldn't tell us how to live, because I don't think it is necessary for the government to involve themselves in something that is so easily changeable and manageable by ourselves. They shouldn't have to deal with the issues that we created.

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  3. I agree with Chelsea that the only guideline to be followed is respect. I think that as humans, we desire face to face contact and that when we are in face to face contact it is important to give the other person you're full attention.
    Yes, technology has made life easier but I do not think that it has improved the quility of life. I think that to build real and genuine relationships one really needs to have real human contact away from hiding behind a screen.
    I think people these days really need to slow down and make sure that the relationships they are building upon are set on a solid foundation of having regulare contact with people face to face.

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  4. I think the purpose/goal of these "cool devices" is exactly that, to give society the freedom within the palms of their hands. But as the saying goes "the more freedom, the more responsibility." Chelsea does bring up a good point about the respectfulness humans should have when dealing with these devices.
    But a problem she also states is "Seldom does a phone vibrate and a young person can just ignore it. Who could it be? What do they want? Is something wrong? These are just a few of the questions running through our head."

    The doctrine of our age is the idea of instant satisfaction. We get what we want, when we want it. It is so deeply rooted into our society that devices become a constant leash that tugs on our neck.

    "Without these things, our society would be moving at a much slower pace, which wouldn't necessarily be a bad thing."-Drew Lee

    And then we are faced with the fact that we as humans must keep up with society or else we will be left in the dust. Is this a bad thing? No. Do people actually live this way? Yes, but very few in the American society. Overall I think that guidelines will always exist but we should keep in mind that "Life is lived forward, but understood backward" -Kierkegaard

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  5. Unfortunately, society has turned to the fast-paced, quick as possible lifestyle and technology has supported us along the way. Don’t get me wrong I love living the fast-paced, always on the go lifestyle; it’s fun, adrenaline-rushing, and you never know what’s going to happen next, but I feel with each new and updated gadget that comes out it only draws people farther away from “real” connections and meaningful conversations with one another.
    However, there are no rules or guidelines for us to follow in regards to technology. Should there be? Eh, I feel there should be a limit especially for the youth however, people are just too busy to take time out and actually sit down and talk to people so instead we text while driving or FaceTime while walking to class. It still lets us connect to our loved ones in a way we never thought was possible, but I feel it is also taking away for genuine conversation and interest in one another.
    I am guilty of texting too much and spending way too much time on the phone each day, but I have to stay connected to what’s going on. I want to know what my friends and family are up to, I am 3,000 miles away from them. Am I an exception? No, regardless there are no guidelines and as each day passes we get more addicted because we downloaded the coolest App or have a long list of friends to text all day. I feel each day we get farther and farther away from reality and more into what our cell phone/ technology has to offer us.

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  6. I dont think there are formal rules that govern the use of these 'cool devices' nor should there be. Even with out formal rules, there should be informal rules that exist. Much the way Joey put it, it is seldom that you see a phone go off unanswered this day and age especially with the youth, myself included. But there should be an informal system of respect that goes along with the absence of former rules. There should be respect enough to not answer a text or phone call if you are in a conversation with some one else. But isnt that a problem that faces much of the youth today aslo? the difference in showing, are possible the all out absence of respect?

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  7. It sounds as if everyone who has responded so far is on the same page! But to mix things up and bring in something else to consider, what do you guys think about what Prof. Hitchcock said today. (We as parents will have a different set of struggles because virtual reality will become such a major emphasis eventually.)

    That comment made me think of something I have been told.

    I've been told that when time comes close to the Rapture and years of Tribulation society will be entirely virtual. For example, we will stop using paper money and use it electronically (credit/debit cards, sending money to bank accounts via iPhone, etc.)

    I'm not sure how accurate that statement is, but my question is: regarding our society with electronics, what is your opinion of the timeline for the coming of the Rapture?

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  8. Not only has our society become obsessed with technology, but we have also become obsessed with stuff. Our mindset is completely consumed with the next big thing, and there is no way to control the human mind and the fabulous ideas it can create. You cannot govern technology for the same reason that freedom of speech is one of the major foundations of this country. I firmly believe that it is my right to do what I want with my own time (within reason). I'm not saying it is okay to do bad things, but no government or ruling body should have the power to dictate what I may or may not do with my time (again, within reason).

    Also, is "inane texting or incessant surfing," mentioned in the beginning, a bad thing? People are inspired by what they see and what relates to them. Is all this technology allowing our society to evolve into a world with hover boards and like Chelsea said, paper money becoming electronic? Are we moving beyond a world where face to face contact is becoming irrelevant? Or are these advances holding us back, forcing our society into a separation so bad that we won't know how to interact socially without a technological aid? How can we know what our future is holding and be able to adjust accordingly? If technology will eventually hurt our societies, how can we learn to adapt?

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  9. I agree with my fellow classmates above. We are all able to set our own standards of how we use and don't use technology. No government or authority has the power to govern how people use technology. There is just no way that people would allow it or abide by it.

    Personally, I love the technology that is available today. It's crazy to think of the stuff that phones, tablets, and laptops can do now that people would have never imagined. We practically have the entire world at our fingertips. I can't even begin to fathom what new technology will continue to be developed over the next few decades. BMW recently put out a commercial highlighting their innovative creations of a new hybrid. Seeing the car that they have been working on building blew my mind. The link is, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvABaopP93g. This video is only a mere glimpse into what the future will look like. There's only a few more years until our lives look like "The Jetsons."

    Technology does have have negative aspects as well. It's clear that our society has become consumed with technology and all that is has provided. ie; texting and Facebook. This technology consumed lifestyle takes away from other qualities of life such as Sports, Music, Personal relationships(not through texting), and etc. It is also somewhat frightening to think of the evil ways that technology is used, and will continue to be used as further developments are made.

    All of that being said, I think it is a blessing to have the technology we have now days. It is important to have a balance although, and to not allow technology to consume us and take us away from all the beautiful people here on campus and from a relationship with God! Thanks for reading guys, I'll see you all in class tomorrow .

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  10. Julianna RondinellaOctober 25, 2011 at 8:57 AM

    Julianna Rondinella

    I agree with a lot of these posts. This is a hard subject to cover because people all view technology in a different way. I would have to say that i do not think that there are gridlines or "rules" to using this technology nor should there be because we purchased the technology on our own and we should be able to use it as we please. HOWEVER there is a consequence to this freedom of technology. Students workers employers and parents all want to be a part of the community and what technology that is going on. I work with an elderly women who is 89 and she just asked me about the Iphone. She wanted to know if it would be worth it for her to get it. She said "I just feel so out of touch with the world" This is a common problem that people may experience when it comes to this technology. If we dont have the newest Iphone or Ipad or whatever the newest thing is we feel out of touch with the world and with others.

    I however can completely agree with Drew Neillie when he stated that he feels that the community would move slower if we didnt have such add-technology. I think that this is a never ending cycle the faster our technology gets the faster the community will get.

    However on Jordan Williams note yes technology is amazing and its so nice to be able to use it wherever we go. It would be so cool to live like the "Jetsons" did one of my favorite shows. It will be very interesting to see how things turn out. Somewhat scary but very interesting.

    So Technology is good and bad but its something thats present in life today so we need to find a happy medium.

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  11. Carolyn, I love how you said that people are obsessed with stuff. You are so right! The first thing I thought of was the iPhone craze over the 4.2, or whatever. People waiting in line 34 hours just to BUY, it was not free, but buy the phone before everyone?

    Jordan, I agree with you on the fact that society is not far from The Jetsons, haha! Also, that technology is a blessing, but it is important to have a balance.

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  12. Referring back to a comment from Erin earlier, I agree that in order to build real genuine relationships, it is important to have human contact. Not to say that a person can't get to know a person via text/computer, because you definitely can, but there is an irreplaceable quality that human contact offers that communication through technology doesn't. Although, when human contact is not an option, as in the case of lets say a soldier in Iraq who wants to see his child, it is technology that makes this possible.

    On another note, I would like to commend Chelsea for spurring this virtual conversation. It is the very topic that we are discussing that makes it possible for us to communicate with each other in this way. This blog has pretty much taken the place of a class discussion. Although I would prefer a class discussion, blogging isn't so bad. Everyone has had great comments!

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  13. With where we are today and the generation we are growing up in currently, technology does seem to stand out to us as much as it does to our parents or grandparents. It is what we have grown up with and it has become apart of our day and age. I must say though, that as the youngest of my family, and none of my siblings nor my parents growing up with the cellphone use or computer use that I do, it stands out to me much more when I am with them than when I am with friend who all have their phones out. For myself, I do not enjoy spending time with someone who cannot set down their phone and have a conversation with me. Technology has cut down on face to face conversation, I believe. We have lost a lot of the old fashioned ways of communicating, such as hand written letters, but there are definitely some positives to where technology is today. In cases of emergencies or a chance to talk to a family member or friend that lives far away, phones and email are a great tool. It has progressed our world so far and we have come out with so many new inventions and ways to grow our world. I am astounded but what has been produced but I am nervous as to see how far technology will go by the time we are parents. I do not want to see our world so overcome with it that we lose all communication, relationships, and sense of family and friendships. It seems we can never have the best. The second we think we do, something even better comes out and it becomes a drive on who can have the best phone or computer. Technology will only rule our society if we let it, so even with all the inventions, it is in our hands how out of control we let it become.

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  14. As EVERYONE else has said before, no one can tell you when to use technology. Referring back to what joey said:

    "The doctrine of our age is the idea of instant satisfaction. We get what we want, when we want it. It is so deeply rooted into our society that devices become a constant leash that tugs on our neck."

    I completely agree that our generation needs "instant satisfaction".It is so routine for us that we do not even realize how much we do use technology. I know you guys had brought up the respectfulness issue as well. By answering that text or taking that phone call you immediately decide that that person is more important than the one you were with. So yes I agree with everyone else that the government cannot put any alloted time period on when to use your electronic devices but as humans we need to learn when those times are appropriate.

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  15. At first glance, this article is touches an issue that is relevant to contemporary society. Steve Jobs live impacted the way we live our lives on a variety of levels. To think that just recently the best way to listen to music was compact discs is mind-blowing. Now at gadget the size of a deck of cards, if not smaller, can hold 40,000 of a users favorite songs. Steve Jobs has been the driving force behind much of this growth.

    When the argument of how technology has effected us arises, I would say it is difficult to reject either side. Sure, the rise of a technology driven society has caused us to be more impersonable. It's much easier to text someone about an awkward topic than to confront them in person. However, if we are mindful and intentional about the ways and about the amount we use technology it can be a very positive thing.

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  16. Referring to Carolyn's comment, and the comments of many of my classmates, I believe as a society we are quick to demonize technology and see it in a very negative light. In doing so we neglect, even discredit, the great purposes technology has served. For example, Dan Wooley, who spoke in chapel on Friday, explained a situation in which he was pinned under a 6 story building in Haiti, with wounds he did not have the knowledge to treat. In that moment, he remembered that he had downloaded a First Aid app. He pulled up the app and got professional medical direction on how to treat his wounds!

    The Westboro Baptist Church protested at Steve Jobs funeral, saying he encouraged sin among young people by presenting appeal products and making them 'worship' technology. Now many of us may not have protested at his funeral, but I feel like we have these same negative attitudes toward technology. If we can embrace the full scope, positive and negative, of how technology has transformed society, than we might be able to not only stop attacking all technological advancement, but acknowledge the fact that Steve Jobs could be called a hero, creating apps that have helped people escape death.

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  18. Technology is such a rudimentary element of our society nowadays. Perhaps it is true that our advancements may be more like the Jetson-age than we truly understand. We have the convenience of the the world at our fingertips, literally.
    But I think the unfortunate truth is I believe our technological advancements do more to shape our lives than we do to shape our usage of technology. What happens when you lose your cell phone or laptop? Automatic panic. Or what about thirty-nine percent of relationships that are kindled through desktops and keyboards, rather than over a cup of coffee or some lunch? It shapes how we interact with one another, how we plan for the future, and even how we go through our daily routines.

    I don’t think people realize how dependent we are on our technology, and what a vital role it plays in our society. I work at The Home Depot and one day the system went down; it was complete chaos! We had lines of customers, but we couldn’t sell any merchandise because the computers were unresponsive. Now imagine that chaos everywhere- gas stations, grocery stores, pharmacies. It’s kind of scary.

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  19. Just as Craig said, "However, if we are mindful and intentional about the ways and about the amount we use technology it can be a very positive thing" This is very true statement because there are many things out there in this world that have progressed or become better due to the technology that we have today. Technology though, should not be overused to the sense that we lose all communication and relational parts of our lives. It should be done in increments, but it should become who we are. It can help in situations of awkwardness or in times of emergency. Also, for example, this blog would not be possible if we did not have the technology that we have now. Technology can be helpful for learning purposes and businesses. I just hope that our world does not become so engrossed with the technology that we lose all but the phones in our hands and computer screens in front of our faces.

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  21. Referring back to Chelsea's post on October 20, I totally agree with you.
    In the end times it does say that paper money will be obsolete and we will actually have it programmed in us like a little chip which sometimes people think could potentially be the "mark of the beast" I am not sure how accurate this statement is either, but in books that I have read it is heavily noted how crazy technology will change before the return of Christ. I do believe that with all these new inventions in technology and always upgrading is a sure sign that Christ' return is not far off.
    Even though I am growing up in the times where technology is advancing like crazy, I sometimes wish that people were so crazy about wanting to discover the latest and greatest thing because I think that is only going to hurt us in the end. Maybe not…just my opinion
    Sorry for the random tangent, but I felt compelled to respond to that post.

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  22. Referring to what Craig said, that is interesting that people protested outside of his funeral. I also like the idea that you brought up how in moderation, technology can be a positive thing. I believe the root of all of our problems in technology is really our ability to know the appropriate amount. So many people are consumed in their blackberys or Iphones that technology is holding us back from being real human beings who can talk to one another and engage in face to face conversation.

    Marlee- I also agree with you that sometimes I wish people weren't so crazy about discovering new technology either. Ya it can hurt us in the end and it would also be nice to get a hand written letter one of these days :)

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  23. Not to simply rehash what so many of my classmates have already said, but I think technology is wonderful. I think it is great that I can Google something instead of having to pull out a big encyclopedia, I am thankful for cellphones and email and skype so that I can talk to my family at any point of the day even though we are in different states, and then there are all the crazy apps and new computer things that I won't even pretend that I know anything about but know are cool. However, if I am being honest, I often times wish I lived back when there were no cellphones or social networking sites or email. I feel like you had to be so much more intentional with your time with others. Checking to see how a person was did not entail looking at their facebook page and calling it good, it took effort. A conversation was not texting back and forth for a few hours a day. That is not to say that people don't put effort into relationships nowadays, but much like what others have already said, I feel like often times people don't place enough emphasis on face-to-face interactions.

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  24. Hello classmates,

    It is obvious that some great discussion has been generated from this topic. Referring to Craig Smith's comment, I can't believe that Westboro Baptist Church protested Steve Jobs funeral. They protest every chance they can get. This reminds me of how they have protested at the funerals of troops who have died fighting for this country. Nothing aggravates me more than seeing a group of "Christians" giving us a bad reputation. I have no problem if they believe that Steve Jobs was a bad influence on society; I would just rather have them throw away the very ipods, ipads, and laptops that they probably use rather than protest a man's funeral.

    On another note, Stephanie is right, our society is extremely dependent on Technology, and that dependency will only increase as technology continues to improve. I believe that technology has both its pros and cons although, and as many of you have said, it is up to us to control how we use it. Marlee also brings up an interesting point about technology and it's correlation to the end times. I encourage you all to read what she wrote. I hope everyone has enjoyed their Thanksgiving break. See you next week! <3<3

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  25. To go off of Meghan's comment, I agree that it is very nice and quite a time saver to doing projects and research. As times get more and more technologically advanced, the easier it is to go along with it because it correlates with how the world is functioning. It can save us a lot of time in many areas of our life, but I worry that we will all start going off the idea of saving time and making every effort to save time. There are times where we need to take time and enjoy the natural pace of things instead of always looking for new ways to save time. If we do that then we start passing up life and the different things we might be able to do in life. Just as Stephanie stated, we might see our world become only more and more dependent and we could all lose our independence as people and workers and families, etc. There is a calming effect to independency. It means we do not always need our cellphones on us or our laptops open to check email or facebook, but we can step away for a while and be on our own, or be in the actual presence of people and enjoy face to face conversations and interaction. As mentioned many times before, technology has its pro's and con's just like many other things in life. It is how a person moderates it that makes the difference and how much their life comes to revolve around it.
    -Brooke Richards

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  26. Technology does have its pros and cons. It helps us do more faster. Just last night i had a song stuck in my head. I went online and purchased it (without using cash!) and was listening to the same song a minute later. 20 years ago, for this to all happen from the comfort of my own couch, would have sounded crazy. Technology helps us be more efficient and to get more done. But overall, what are some of the cons you guys are thinking of? I can see how the speed of things really pulls away from our interpersonal skills as whole. But what else is there?

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  27. Are there absolute guidelines? When looking back at Steve Job's life and his amazing inventions, it always makes me wonder.. what if.. What if he was a believer? I don't know who can answer that but I do believe as technology advances we as Christians must still hold firmly onto our faith. I'm not saying that my iPhone is the devil but I do think I spend more time on it then I do reading scripture. This is a problem that could possibly wipe out all of our faith if these devices become to cheap that I can have a Pac, iPhone, iPad, and other devices that take up all my time. As for Steve Jobs I believe he did so much with what he had.. his creativeness, his intelligence, and his dedication were highly visible. But what if he had God on his side? What else could he have done?

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  28. I have to agree with Sharon. More often then not, the product of a person's work is influenced by their belief system. I can only imagine the direction some of Steve Jobs inventions might have taken if his thought system had been oriented in a different way. Because people are so easily manipulated by the advancements of his technology, we probably underestimate the had the ability to influence a society as a whole..

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  29. To comment back to Stephanie, we could do so much with this technology that he has invented. We could help the homeless, we could do a live feed to raise money for a good cause and so on. I feel like this technology has made us more self-centered than we were before.

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  30. Technology is changing ever so quickly. The devices we used years ago have turned into pocket sized items that most people feel couldn't live without. The growth scientists and engineers have made has propelled our society and nation into the dominate force it is today. It has provided better security, enjoyable leisure time, and the opportunity to gain more knowledge in a more comprehensive manner.
    But in reality, is this advancement hindering us from moving forward in other areas such as our appreciation for nature and face to face social interaction. Today, the majority of people would rather sit at home on a computer, be on facebook, or search the web. Our passion for being outdoors and staying active has decreased dramatically. The scary thing is, us as a society seem to be okay with it. In any situation, an advancement in one area causes a decline in another. Therefore, it is important that we try to prevent ourselves from undermining the things of the past. They were the stepping stones to our present.

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  32. Steve Jobs has definitely made his mark in the innovative world, but he has also created a "now" generation. It seems that nowadays there is a new app coming out everyday to substitute things that would've taken a lot of effort on my part (back in the day) to figure out on my own without technology. Because of this availability for instant results and fast responses, our culture has become heavily dependent on technology to supply us with answers. Ten years ago, Nokia phones were the latest technology and were the size of a brick, with no back light and the game Snake as the only form of entertainment on any up to date cellular device! Nowadays, we get frustrated when our devices take longer than thirty seconds, and this has created much impatience within our society.

    When looking at this topic in the light, our dependency is derived from the fact that we are able to have and experience so many forms of service in just one device, such as that of an iPad or an iPhone.

    With that being said, technological innovations, such as those works of Steve Jobs', have come to embody reunions and connections. Programs such as Skype and FaceTime help to bring family members together around the world. Instant messaging has been able to make it feel like a person who is thousands of miles away is at your pocket's reach. Social networking sites, like Facebook, make sharing lives with old friends and engaging in new friendships based on mutual friends easier. But this has caused not only our world to shrink, but also, the scope of recreation in which we immerse ourselves in. Instead of seeing kids outside in the streets playing with chalk on the sidewalks and riding their bikes around the culdesac, the majority of them stay indoors on the computer playing monotonous, similar goal-oriented games. What happened to making the most out of a sunny day? Or, even as young and old adults, going out on a Friday night instead of lurking around on Facebook, or watching a movie at the theaters rather than on Netflix?

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  33. In response to David's comment (November 29), I have to agree that the number of services that single pieces of technology have to offer today and the efficiency that they are made to perform with are very eye opening. In my previous post, I did mention some of the cons that growing technology and the threats that they had come to pose on society. But there are many pros to balance those cons out too!

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  34. Steve Jobs was at the very least, a revolutionary business man and innovator. The question of whether technology and the places it is taking society is a positive, God pleasing one still remains. I know we all can go on ( and some of us already have) about how much we love our portable devices and the conviences they offer but we should ask ourselves, at what cost does this come? I often have considered why our whole american society is failing terribly. The reasons for this can be innumerable but perhaps the biggest reason is a shift in focus. Our nation was founded on the backs of hard working men with Godly morals who took pride in there work. Today technology has not only changed the way we do things but also the amount of time we have to do them. It has made immoratlity easier to access with online porn. It has made stealing someone else's ideas, money or music just a click away. With this accessiblity and the amount of time the average person has in a day it is little suprise the constant shift toward immorality we have experienced in america today. I would argue that technology, is not only the best but the worst thing man has ever created. We all love our devices, but each generation is being more and more dependant on them. They are not just dependant but also influenced by them. This is a scary thought when you consider the amount of immorality is promoted by the technology we see listen to everyday. I think perhaps we as christians must step back and find some balance. There was a time a time when people had to work, excellence was in a way required for surival. If you didn't plant your crops with all the knowledge and effort you possed you may very well starve. It may seem extreme but we, with the time we are now afforded do absolutely nothing. I know this because I am guilty of it myself. Even if a person has to do something we seem to do it with minimal effort because as people we only seem what we absolutly have to. With technology we can get by with it. Now I know you think I am crazy, your in college and so busy but lets be honest, how busy are you really. People used to work literally from dawn till dusk, not even eating. That at least a twelve hour stretch and I know none of us work like that anymore. I am not saying this is bad, I am just saying the next time your on your devices perhaps (or I am) I think we should we should ask ourselves what we are doing to better our lives.

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  35. Going off on Zach's recent post. Your thoughts were interesting, some I agreed with and some I didn't. But I did like how you adressed how easy it is to sin with technology. I never really looked at it that way, but it's so true. We really don't think illegally downloading is a "sin" persay but really it is stealing. And also all the temptations that lurk on the internet they are so easy to get to, letting sin into our lives from technology is fairly simple and also a downfall technology offers.

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  36. In response to Zach's post, I do agree that the Internet has opened a lot of doors for virtual theft and other sinful indulgences, but I also believe that technology is not the right spot to place all the blame on. The opportunities that the Internet offers in terms of crime and sinful indulgences are things that have always existed and offences that have already been committed time and time again prior to our generation; it is just in a different form - in that of the Internet.

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  37. I just wanted to follow up my last post, as from reading responses I can see that I may have come across quite negative. In response to chynna's post I do agree that sin has existed long before technology. Your quite right, I would even be willing to argue the case that there is less sin in the world today than some of those described in biblical times. People now spend there time online and there sinful indulgences have less of a direct effect on others lives. There was a time when you getting rob probably meant physical assault and sexual sins, well we don't even have to go there. So i do agree with that I am just worried that with the accesabilty and our recent complacency with sin, it will only get worse. On the opposite side of this arguement I must point out that it has really made distance much less of an issue. It has allowed people, people of many different races, creeds and beliefs to speak instantly with one another. It has made the sharing of ideas or knowledge so much easier. I could never say this is a bad thing. I would also say it offers us as christians a great opportunity to spread the Word. It also allows us a great many ways to strengthen our own walks with God.

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  38. Zach, that is a great point! Technology definitely has made the world a smaller place when it comes to communication. Using the internet alone it can be a great way to spread the good news. Technology though, as most things has its ups and downs, but its how you use it that makes the difference.

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  39. Im not going to lie, I am very much dependent on my iphone. That is just how our generation is and there is nothing that we can really do about it. However, I am AWARE of my dependency which is a good thing. As long as we can get others to start thinking about the amount of time that they spend on the computer, cell phones, ipads, ect. then we can further people to see how much of an influence it has on their life. When we first were assigned our final projects, Professor Hitchcock challenged us to at least THINK about what we were going to do, even if we were going to procrastinate. I think that is precisely what we need to do. Get others aware, and see where it goes from there!

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  40. Going off of John's comment from December 5th, I completely agree with you! The way society has made it the norm to sit in front of the tv or computer instead of going outside or doing some sort of physical activity is a little bit scary.

    One thing that I actually get really concerned about is the younger generation that is growing up with even more technology at their fingertips than we had. I know growing up my parents heavily regulated how much TV I was allowed to watch and how much time I was allowed to spend on the computer. Back then it was a drag, but I am so appreciative of it now. My siblings and I had to be creative and use our imaginations to entertain ourselves, something that, I believe, is crucial as a kid. I feel like I see so much less of that now though. I have little cousins and kids I babysit and all they can talk about are certain TV shows or videogames. I taught swim lessons to a 2 and a half year old this summer and he could already tell me all about Angry Birds. I know of a 4 year old who has his own ipad. I don't think that is right at all! I mean, I know people probably said the same things about our age group when we were younger, but we have advanced SO much further even since then, and I am concerned about the effect that technology may have on kids growing up today.

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  41. Last year for lent, I gave up Facebook. I never cheated, so for 40 days, I never visited Facebook. The first thing I did when I gave it up was delete the link off the top of my computer. It is such a habit for me to just click on that the second I open up the Internet. I would find myself trying to click there even after it had been deleted. I eventually realized that I spent less time on the Internet because those mindless hours of Facebook disappeared. I got more schoolwork done and I had more time to hang out with friends. All this for giving up Facebook. The biggest thing I realized was that I didn't need Facebook. Forty days without something and you realize that it isn't necessary. The same goes for cell phones and television. Humans as a race have become accustomed to these luxuries, but we really don't need them. Our culture tells us that we need them, but humans have existed for thousands of years without the technology we have. Some of this technology is beneficial and really improves society, but others, such as Facebook, really don't need to exist. It causes more problems than its worth.

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  42. Though technology has its loop holes into a destructive world, I believe it is upon oneself to use it correctly. There are multiple multiple ways our advanced technology can be used in a bad nature by average people in our society today. People can now live a two faced life via text message and Facebook. What people read on a text could be words of another person or just something over thought on the other end instead of a natural message out of the sender mouth. With Facebook we can now show the sides we want people to see of us, and hide the things we don't. Also there is the twisted side of the internet when it comes to pornography and predators getting in contact and the in the minds of innocent people through social networks and chatrooms. Yes all of this could probably be regulated by the government, but would that really change the nature of the people doing all these bad things. I believe that technology is used wrong, but I also believe that those people who use it wrong will find some other way to do bad in this world. In conclusion I don't blame technology for all these bad things, yet I blame the people.

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  43. I would have to agree with Erin's comment on October 19th. Face to face communication is something that is going extinct in our society today. People might think that texting is an easier way to get things done, but in reality it is a completely different and weaker way to communicate. The convenience of texting is something that is good, but can easily be abused. When it comes to my life, I enjoy texting when it comes to things like planning to meet up in person, but I leave good meaningful conversation for a face to face situation. I enjoy going to coffee shops with my friends and just talking while I feel like our society likes to get conversation done while staying in bed and opening up their computer or unlocking their phone to text. I feel like my generation has had enough experience without all of this technology to realize the change and hopefully catch themselves from becoming a two faced tech talker. I am very interested to see what happens to the younger generation who carries around iPhones in middle school. I feel like middle school is a very dangerous age to have this technology in hand and I am worried that our younger generations won't make it out okay.

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  44. bouncing off of John's comment.... If we become to consumed with future inventions and technology we may forget our roots. We cant let the inventors be the only one to have imaginations. We all need to find our uniqueness, and that isn't done conforming to society by being on Facebook all day.

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  45. Responding to Zach's post....I have to agree that our society is becoming more and more dependent on technology. Imagine that one day our technological system were to crash. It would be complete caos. The life we know today would never be the same. Is it wise to trust all the valuable information data and everyday commodoties? Things will at some point crash and we will not be ready. The world as we know it will greatly change.

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  46. Overall, I feel that this whole conversation has stressed even more that change is scary and doesn't always have its upsides, but it is inevitable. Technology is changing our world and along with the incredible advances that come with it, a dependence that nearly handicaps us follows. The choice is whether or not we choose to allow the negative parts of technology alter us completely. I feel that you have to challenge yourself to not be as dependent on technology. Try going without technology for a day. Turn off your phone when you go on vacation, turn off Facebook during finals week. These things are easy and will help our generation to improve mental capacities in a world where knowledge is all cyber. I've learned that I have to challenge myself because the negative affects of technology will alter me socially if I let it.

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  47. I have to agree with Sharon that what if? The only dangerous thing about saying that is we start wanting to change the past and dwell on it. Us as a society need to focus on the now and how we can change what already is. Looking back in the past is good, but only for a second because it is easy to get lost up in it.
    The difficult part is technology has become such a huge part of our lives that is hard to see ourselves without it. A day without my phone is like torture. It was not to long ago that a landline phone was a big deal.

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  48. I believe that the two main problems with the 'i' generation and it's array of products are 1). stewardship and 2). materialism.
    I think stewardship in our generation is a huge problem. People do not necessarily look at the most effective ways they can spend their time and money, but instead they choose the most convenient or most appealing option. The presentation that Sharon and I did on bottled water reveals exactly how our society is focussed on convenience and luxury. Most often, people prefer the most expensive option of a product when that product is not necessarily better.
    This leads us into the problem of materialism. Our country is in a recession due to debt and interest rates. Many people made the choice to spend above and beyond their means- to get the next big thing that maybe they could not afford. Furthermore, this recession has not brought us back down to earth. It hash't shattered the views of the material, in my opinion it has only strengthened them. Our focus is still on the material- just how to get it cheaper this time around.

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  49. I appreciate Carolyn's honesty and the idea that we all need to be held personally responsible for our usage of technology. On top of that, I think we also need to hold each other accountable as much as possible. I know I have trouble staying off Facebook or my iPhone unless I have a friend there scolding me.
    Another good point she makes is regarding our mental capacities. In our senior seminar class we have talked a lot about technology and whether or not it 'makes us dumb'. There are numerous tasks that we no longer have to think about doing- instead we have machines to do them for us. This reminds me of the old calculator dilemma in math class and middle school teachers forcing us to put them away and really think. When you don't have that calculator- you'll be stumped. The same goes for our technology these days- when we're without it, we're crippled.

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  50. In response to Brady's comment (December 12, 2011 2:48 PM), I love that he brings up the point of the double life. I know a lot of people who rely on technology for their relationships. They rely on the text and instant message to effectively express their feelings, but when it comes to face-to-face communication- they are absolutely clueless. In some ways, this is positive. For the shy person it provides them a way to more easily interact. However, at the same time, people are given an excuse to socially inept and otherwise uninterested in real social interactions. It's a double-edged sword that clearly shows the good and bad sides of technological advances in our society.

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  51. I found it really interesting that the hold technology has over our lives could be seen in some of the final presentations. Many of us chose topics that interested us personally, which consequently ended up being some form of technological advancements like the camera or time travel.

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  52. I feel that these devices have both advanced and diminished certain aspects of the human culture. In one hand, you have the technological advancements and creativity that comes from that which in turn benefits society even more. And in the other hand, this non-confrontational society is turning into a society that fears face to face communication and lacks the important skills of the real world. And don't get me started on the grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors that have plagued this generation because of the technology we now have.
    It is important that we exercise both our personal communication skills and spelling and grammar skills, as well as engage in the advancements in our society and become fluent in the changes that are making our world a better more productive world.

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  53. I agree that technology does seem to be a double edged sword. There are the obvious convenience, creative and entertainment factors, but I also think there are a lot of safety "pros" with the advancement of technology. This can be anywhere from heart monitors to cell phones. Speaking specifically about cell phones, I personally do feel safer if I am somewhere unfamiliar, or somewhere alone and have my phone with me. Knowing that I can instantly call for help if I need it. In some ways I think it sort of serves as a safety blanket.

    However, as many people have already alluded to, I think that often times technology (especially cell phones) serves as a social safety blanket. I don't know how many times I've relied on my phone to be my "buddy" when I'm waiting in a line, or stuck in a room with people I don't know...or I guess even sometimes I'll rely on it if I'm stuck in a room of people I do know and don't want to talk to. And while at these moments, I am grateful for this vice, I don't know that I would say it is necessarily a good thing. Because, for every conversation that I avoid, I will never know if there was something about that moment that I missed out on.

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  54. My concluding thoughts on this discussion is wondering where technology is going to go in the future. I believe that it is up to our generation to make a new movement in technology to better advance the social aspects of it. I think we all can see how technology can intervene with socially enhancing the mind. I think there is a way to use advance technology while at the same time keeping social norms and values. I am very interested to see what this looks like in the future.

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    1. Brady,
      Do you feel as if technology is keeping us from advancing socially? I am with you too in seeing what technology will look like in the future, but I can't help to think the more we indulge in technology the harder it because to break from those norms and create new ones

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  55. I'm realizing also, as I read thought these posts and attempt to write another one, that I think technology plays a role in my attention span. Others have mentioned the increased efficiency in our lives as a result of technology, which I agree is something that has been enormously helpful in my life, especially as my life gets even busier. But, I think that this "immediacy" or efficiency makes it harder for me to focus on one thing at a time. As I sat down to write this, I read one post, and then had to click on another page before I could come back and do my work. There is so much to do on one computer screen, and so many places I can go on one computer screen, than I can't just focus on one. Though the content of my academics may be strengthened as a result of this efficient information available to me, it has had an unfortunate affect on how quickly I get it done...which seems to be the opposite of efficient.

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  56. Apple has lost a visionary and creative genius, and the world has lost an amazing human being," Mr. Cook said in a letter to employees. "We will honor his memory by dedicating ourselves to continuing the work he loved so much."

    During his more than three-decade career, Mr. Jobs transformed Silicon Valley as he helped turn the once-sleepy expanse of fruit orchards into the technology industry's innovation center. Mr. Jobs proved the appeal of well-designed products over the power of technology itself and transformed the way people interact with technology.

    KiKi Ye

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  57. The world rarely sees someone who has had the profound impact Steve has had, the effects of which will be felt for many generations to come," Mr. Gates said in a statement Wednesday.



    Tianzhu Qin

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  58. I love what Steve Jobs has contributed to our world. In high school I used to watch the presentations and unveilings of all of Apple's new products. I think the biggest thing Steve left for us was a new way of understanding what the human wants. He abandoned focus groups because he knew what would sell.
    Our overconsumption of technology can not be blamed on Steve Jobs. He did not invent the telephone. The death of face to face conversation occurred long before cell phones. I want kids to play outside again and not play video games. I want them to read books on paper and not on a screen, but we're beyond that. We're always going to find a quicker, cooler way to do all our tasks. My hope is that parents will be the ones to tell kids to turn off their phones at the table and connect. But it's the parents, and teachers of the world that are going to have to instruct the next generations.

    G. Santos

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  59. Steve Jobs is one of my idols. I have been a fan of apple products ever since the first ipod came out. I was fascinated with this company that seemingly came out of no where. I remember the first time that I saw an apple ad. They had signs in Seattle with these colorful people dancing with what looked like strings coming out of their ears. It took me a while to figure out what they were advertising for but they quickly took over the music industry and eventually the phone and labtop industry for college students. There products can be compared to as drugs. People feel a need to have them. They don't care how much they cost they will buy them just because of the apple logo. One of the funnier vidoes I have ever scene is one that pokes fun at consumers of apple products that will buy anything they sell. This video had an imaginary product that was horrible but people were lining up to spend millions of dollars because Steve Jobs said it was the way of the future. Here is the link:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9BnLbv6QYcA
    I think that consumers need to be careful with such a powerful company. Just because they say that you need a product does not mean that you actually need it. Were people actually less happy before smart phones became the norm? I feel that smart phones have taken over our world and are one of the biggest wastes of time in the world. I miss the world without the need to constantly be in contact with people that are not around you. I miss phone calls. I miss hand written letters. Consumers just need to be careful. I do think that Steve Jobs was a great man though and I have a tremendous amount of respect for him. RIP

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  60. I think it is easy to say that there shouldn’t be any rules regarding the use of technology because we are all free people. Yes, we may be free and have the right to use technology whenever and for whatever we want but I don’t think we see the major affects it has on us and those around us. I saw firsthand what it did to my brother once he got his first smart phone. He couldn’t keep his eyes off the screen which hindered his communication skills and drastically decreased his attention span. It really makes me wonder what my brothers personality would be like if he never got a smart phone. Would he be more talkative? Would he be able to hold a conversation better? Would he be less awkward? I even see these traits in some of my friends. One of my biggest pet-peeves is when I am out somewhere with my friends and they are all on their phone for the majority of the time. It makes me feel as if my company isn’t enough and that they would rather be doing something else than spending time with me. I know that isn’t the case, but it’s hard to believe anything else when their face is buried in the phones. I made it a rule that whenever anyone is which me they can’t be on their phones unless it’s an emergency. This may be looked at as old school but I am a quality time kind of person and value friendships and conversation so much. Maybe someday things will get better in this aspect of society and technology but until then I will continue to encourage others to not be on their phone as much even if we do have the freedom to use technology whenever and wherever we want.

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    1. I agree, I think that we have the free will to choose whether or not we should have guidelines while using these devices, but it may not be the best thing. I like to relate this to the biblical idea of free will. We have free will in the sense that we have a choice. We have the choice whether to align our hearts and minds with God or to not. When our hearts are in line with what God is doing, it is then God's original choice that we are reacting to and not our own. So while we have free will, when we follow God, we give up our free will for his. This is just like the phones and devices. While we have the choice to use them whenever for efficiency. We should instead align our self with the concept of relationship and should put our phones down more often. We have the choice but one choice is more beneficial.

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  61. Steve Jobs has made a lot of cool creations that has made a lot of things possible. On the downside, we have to be a lot more careful about the way we use technology. I personally, wish that phones did not exist so people could still use snail mail and love the idea of being 100 percent present with the people in front of you all the time. I do love my cell phone, but hate how easily I can be distracted. I sometimes set up hard guidelines from myself to keep me from wasting time on my phone. I think no hard guidelines are needed, but people just need to use wisdom and discernment when using technological devices. The biggest problem I have seen with cell phones, is that they are addicted to checking their phone. I see people on their phones at work, in class, and when they are in deep conversations with other people. I hope that as technology increases, people will learn to put down the phone and look up at the beautiful world and people around us.

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  62. As many before me have stated, I also disagree that there should be formal guidelines in how we respond or use our "cool devices." It is crazy to reflect back and see how technology has changed our society. In the sense I believe it has somewhat made us desensitized as human beings. I think a text or call on a device should essentially act as just a verbal conversation. Just as many have said it should follow the only guideline of respect. the government should be able to dictate when and how we should respond to things they we may not see the need to or even have the time to

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